Wildlife Photography: Episode 1

I have owned a professional DSLR camera for about 9 months now and I have been using it to advance my wildlife photography skills (although not exclusively wildlife).

I have decided to use my blog as a platform to share my wildlife photography, and occasionally any other images that I particularly love!

What I’d really love to get from these posts is to share my work and inspire other and to also get people sharing their wildlife photography with me too so that we can all learn and grow as photographers together!!

I’d love to know if you guys will enjoy this or not, so please leave me a comment below letting me know, or send me a message on Facebook, or even check out my actual photography Instagram to keep up to date with my photography!

So without further ado, here are my favourite wildlife photographs that I captured so far!!

 

Hope you enjoyed these images and I’d love to see everyone else’s too!

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Dog Breeds 101: Pembroke Welsh Corgi

 

Pembroke-Welsh-Corgi-On-White-01.jpgKEY INFORMATION

Lifespan

Height

Weight

12-14 years

10-12 inches

27 to 30 pounds

pembroke-welsh-corgi.jpgTEMPERAMENT

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is known for being a happy, loving and intelligent breed. However, they can have a stubborn and independent streak. Generally they are easy to train but they do like to think for themselves at times.

This breed loves food and it can be used as a great motivator during training, but as they love to eat they can easily become obese if their food is not regulated.

Pembroke Welsh Corgis make good watchdogs as they are suspicious of strangers and are quick to bark when their households or themselves feel threatened.

Like all dogs the Pembroke Welsh Corgi requires early socialisation to ensure they grow into healthy, happy and well-rounded adults.

prance-8.jpgGROOMING

This breed is double coated with a think undercoat and longer topcoat; because of this they shed continuously with heavy shedding twice a year. They are easy to groom but shedding can cause a problem is brushing isn’t kept up with. It is recommended to brush your Pembroke Welsh Corgi once a day while they are going through their heavy shedding.

CHILDREN AND OTHER PETS

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi will get on well with children but due to their natural herding instinct they are prone to biting children on the ankles and feet. This is a behaviour that can be trained out at a young age however.

Again, as long as they are socialised with other pets in the household they will get along well.

Sources:

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For more Dog Breeds 101 click here!

On The Brink: Dama Gazelle

 

Dama-Gazelle-3-700x350.jpgThe Dama Gazelle (Nanger dama) is a critically endangered (CR) antelope living in Africa. They have been listed a CR since 2006 when they were upgraded from endangered due to having a population size below 250 mature individuals. There are currently 5 surviving subpopulations which are fragmented and are considered to contain less than 50 mature individuals.

Dama-Gazelle.jpgWhile the Dama Gazelle used to roam most of the Sahara and surrounding countries, it is now only native in Chad, Mali and Niger after going extinct in Mauritania, Senegal, Sudan, Tunisia and the Western Sahara.

maxresdefault.jpgThe main threats that caused the decline in numbers of the Dama Gazelle was the introduction of firearms which lead to the uncontrolled hunting of the Dama Gazelle. They also have harm from habitat loss and degradation cause by the overpopulation of domestic animals and pastureland.

The biggest problem they are facing to their conservation is whether to isolate populations to reduce chances of external diseases and intraspecies competition or to allow them to integrate and breed within the different populations. The largest issue with isolating populations is that inbreeding will reduce genetic diversity and their ability to adapt to new diseases and habitat change.

To learn more about the Dama Gazelle and their conservation head over to the IUCN Red List.

Images sourced from:

My Favourite Animal Films

Now this post is going down a slightly different route, and I wanted to post this before I took a break from my blog but I never really plucked up the courage to try something different than the set routine posting schedule that I created for myself. Now that I have broke free from this routine (well a little anyway) it leaves me free to write what I enjoy and to post it when I feel like it.

Please leave me a comment or send me a message on my Facebook or Twitter letting me know what you think!


EIGHT BELOW

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Synopsis:

Brutal cold forces two Antarctic explorers to leave their team of sled dogs behind as they fend for their survival.

Why I Love It:

I have always been a fan of Paul Walker so it made sense to watch the film, and I’m not sorry that I did. The range of emotions that this film brings out in me gets me every time and its definitely a film that I will come back to time and time again.

WARNING YOU WILL CRY.


MAX

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Synopsis:

A Malinois dog that helped American Marines in Afghanistan returns to the United States and is adopted by his handler’s family after suffering a traumatic experience.

Why I Love It:

The idea by this film is simply fantastic, there’s so many films about soldiers that have experienced traumatic events in war zones, and the fact that a film was made about the dogs who also go through the same events is amazing. I have never felt so many emotions throughout a film as in this one.

WARNING HAVE PLENTY OF TISSUES (I think I only made it about 15 minutes in before I needed them).


HOMEWARD BOUND

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Synopsis:

Three pets escape from a California ranch to find their owners in San Francisco.

Why I Love It:

Quite simply this film (and the sequel) is my childhood. It may be aimed at kids but I’ll love it forever.


FREE WILLY

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Synopsis:

When a boy learns that a beloved killer whale is to be killed by the aquarium owners, the boy risks everything to free the whale.

Why I Love It:

Who doesn’t?


DOLPHIN TALE

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Synopsis:

A story centered on the friendship between a boy and a dolphin whose tail was lost in a crab trap.

Why I Love It:

Its such a heartwarming story of a group of people desperately saving an animal who is destined for death if left in the wild. Truly amazing and based on the true story of Winter, who can be seen in person at Clearwater Marine Aquarium.


TURNER AND HOOCH

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Synopsis:

A detective must adopt the dog of a dead man to help him find the murderer.

Why I Love It:

Tom Hanks! A young Tom Hanks is possibly the best movie maker of all time, you’ll laugh and cry (but mostly laugh) at this crime fighting duo! Turner & Hooch is number 2 in my all time favourite films (just beaten by Apollo 13, Tom Hanks yet again!).


I’d love to hear what everyone else’s favourite animal films are! Leave me a comment below to let me know, maybe you’ll give me a new favourite!!


Synopses from iMDB.com


Images Courtesy Of:

Dog Breeds 101: Pyrenean Mountain Dog

Hi guys,

I know I’ve been missing for several months but the time has come to make my return, I have missed blogging and sharing my knowledge and connecting with people online, but I did completely lose my inspiration and motivation for the blog and I had got to a point where I wasn’t happy with the posts that were going up! A break was well needed so that I could get my head in the right place to continue delivering content that I am proud of and that people will enjoy.

With all that said I’m going to dive into this post!

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KEY INFORMATION

Lifespan

Height

Weight

10-12 years

65-82cm

36-54kg

TEMPERAMENT

Pyreneans although giant in stature, are gentle dogs particularly around children which has made them a family favourite for many years. However, like many large dogs Pyreneans are slow to mature and only reach full maturity between 3 and 4 years of age, and this must be taking into account when training them.

Also, Pyreneans contain a stubborn streak that can provide further challenges during training, but despite this they are extremely loyal and form unbreakable bonds with their families. They respond well to positive reinforcement training but don’t take too kindly to any negative reinforcement, which may lead them to more disobedient behaviour. Furthermore, they enjoy the sound of their own voices and will bark at any noise unless this behaviour is assessed early on in life.

Like all dogs the Pyrenean Mountain Dog requires socialisation from a young age to enable them to mature into well-rounded and happy dogs.

Also, due to their inquisitive nature Pyreneans are quite the escape artists and so a well fenced yard is required to ensure they don’t leave for their own adventures. They also contain a high prey drive so intense training is needed for off leash walking as they are generally unresponsive to a recall command when they are in that frame of mind.

pyrenean-mountain-dog-puppy.jpgFAMILY LIVING

The Pyrenean Mountain Dog loves being in a family environment and thoroughly enjoy being involved in things that go on around them, which includes playing with children. While most Pyreneans take care to be extra gentle around children, their large size and strength can be something of an issue and extra attention is needed around the children.

Pyreneans will get on with other pets in the house such as cats if they have been raised with them and if socialised correctly they will also get along with other dogs.

HEALTH

The Pyrenean Mountain Dog has some hereditary conditions such as:

  • Hip dysplasia (due to their size, risk factor can reduced by not allowing the dog to climb up and down stairs, and to use shorter walks until they have reached maturity to ensure that there is less stress on the joints while they are growing)
  • Epilepsy
  • Tricuspid dysplasia
  • Osteosarcoma
  • Entropion (eyelids folding inwards)
  • Bloat/Gastric torsion (the risk of this can also be minimised by using a raised feeder and ensuring the dog doesn’t eat too quickly)

Pyrenean-Mountain-Dog.jpgGROOMING

Pyreneans require a lot of grooming due to their double coat. Ideally, they need to be brushed everyday to remove dead and loose hair and prevent matting. As they have a double coat they shed a lot of hair, more so in the Spring and then Autumn.

It is also important to keep their ears clean to prevent a build up of wax that can cause ear infections.

EXERCISE

Although the Pyrenean Mountain Dog is a low energy dog they still require a decent amount of exercising. The recommended amount is around 2 hours of exercise a day for these dogs to ensure they have enough physical and mental stimulation. However, as said earlier it is important to not overexercise a Pyrenean early in life while their bones and joints are still developing to avoid issues with their joints later in life.

 

Source:

Images Courtesy Of:

 

 

My Favourite Wildlife Books

  1. Blue Planet 2
    519TNByytDL._SX378_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgJust in case you can’t watch the TV series, you can read the book!!
  2. The Blackbird Diaries
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  3. The Inner Life of Animals

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  4. Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?

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MAGAZINE ENTRY!

World of Animals

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I’ve listed these books (and magazine) as I’m a book lover who is looking for some more wildlife book recommendations! If you know of any others please let me know!!

My Experience With A Difficult Dog

Happy New Year to my readers! I hope you had a good holiday season and you are now looking forward to the New Year like myself. For this post I’m going to be writing about my experience with my difficult dog.

IMG_0158.JPGJust over three years ago we got a new puppy who we picked because he was the runt of the litter, getting picked on by the other puppies in his litter and had an infection running throughout his tiny body. The breeder mentioned that he had growled at everyone who had been to see him. It was for all these reasons that we picked him, knowing that he was likely to be a difficult dog and that if he went to the wrong people disaster could happen.

Our little puppy found his home on my sister’s knee and it took a lot of coaxing to get him to come off. He was a scared little guy. Luckily he was introduced to all of my family while he was still extremely young and so was unable to physically do damage to us. Now that he is older however, it is almost impossible to introduce him to new people without him being muzzled. We don’t trust him to not try to attack and are responsible dog owners who would never allow that to happen.

IMG_1921.JPGOn walks he is perfectly fine with a head collar and a choke collar which allows us to move his focus and to also discipline him if necessary. It did take a lot of hard work to get to this point as he usually just cowered whenever a car went past and then refused to move any further.

Last year I got into a relationship and this caused some problems regarding our little psycho dog as we call him. It meant that for my other half to visit my house, the dog needed to be muzzled. Unfortunately muzzling him makes him much more aggressive than he is without.

IMG_1922.JPGOn Christmas, we made a big breakthrough on my puppy and partner’s relationship. Using a head collar and choke collar we were able to keep my dog under control and calm long enough for my partner to give him commands and reward him with a treat. It really was Christmas!!

Do any of my reader have experience with difficult dogs? Leave me a comment below or speak to me over at Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.