With almost 250,000 square miles of space France is packed with wildlife from the Alpine Ibex to the Common Genet.


ALPINE IBEX
(Capra ibex)
MG_5228_950Pixels_WM.jpgListed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List with a increasing population trend. There is estimated to be around 31420 mature individuals remaining in the wild.

HABITAT, DIET & BEHAVIOUR
You can find an Alpine Ibex on open and rocky habitats at high altitudes. They feed on alpine grasses and are a diurnal species that is most active in the early morning and late afternoon.

MAJOR THREATS
Currently they are not believed to be facing any threats but there are concerns about their genetic diversity. Their habitats are surrounded by high densities of domestic goats and sheep which can carry a risk of parasites and disease.

CONSERVATION
The Alpine Ibex is listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

KINGDOM PHYLUM CLASS ORDER FAMILY
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Cetartiodactyla Bovidae

BEECH MARTEN
(Martes foina)
beech marten.jpgThe Beech Marten is listed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List with a stable population trend.

HABITAT
Beech Martens prefer open areas, however in countries such as France they are becoming more common in urban and suburban areas. In these countries they can be found nesting in attics, barns and even in car engine spaces.

MAJOR THREATS
These little animals can sometimes be persecuted as a pest and some of them also suffer from rabies.

CONSERVATION
Beech Martens are also listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

KINGDOM PHYLUM CLASS ORDER FAMILY
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Carnivora Mustelidae

CHAMOIS
(Rupicapra rupicapra)
chamois-4-640x425.pngThis species is also luckily listed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List with around 440,000 mature individuals remaining in the wild.

HABITAT & DIET
The Chamois likes to live on steep, rocky areas in the mountain and they feed on grasses, herbs, leaves, buds, shoots and fungi.

MAJOR THREATS
They are currently suffering from poaching and overhunting; and they are also facing competition from domestic livestock. There have also been outbreaks of pestivirus and sarcoptic mange in some populations.

CONSERVATION
Yet another species from France that is listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

KINGDOM PHYLUM CLASS ORDER FAMILY
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Cetartiodactyla Bovidae

COMMON GENET
(Genetta genetta)
CommonGenet.JPGListed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List and with a stable population trend.

HABITAT & DIET
The Common Genet prefers wooded habitat and can often be found around water. They feed primarily on small mammals but they will also take birds, vertebrates, insects and fruit depending on the availability of prey.

MAJOR THREATS
The main threats for these animals come from road traffic collisions and hunting. They are killed for their meat, body parts, skin and fur.

CONSERVATION
They are mostly found in protected areas and they are also listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

KINGDOM PHYLUM CLASS ORDER FAMILY
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Carnivora Viverridae

ALPINE MARMOT
(Marmota marmota)
marmot.jpgThese little rodents are listed as Least Concern (YAY FOR FRANCE!!) by the IUCN Red List with a stable population trend.

HABITAT & DIET
They live in alpine meadows and high altitude pastures eating a fully herbivorous diet.

MAJOR THREATS
Alpine Marmots are hunting for their meat, fur and fat.

CONSERVATION
They mostly occur in national park and are listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

KINGDOM PHYLUM CLASS ORDER FAMILY
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Rodentia Sciuridae

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