PERUVIAN WOOLLY MONKEY
(Lagothrix cana)
Endangered

57bafda8408a8.image.jpgMAJOR THREATS
This species is heavily hunted and infants are much favoured as pets. The females with offspring tend to be targeted by hunters, so that they can sell the infants as pets. Hunting is the main threat prior to deforestation, and colonization severely reduces their numbers.  Heavy deforestation also occurs in many parts of this species’ range.

FUN FACT
Can move at speeds of up to 35mph.


HUMBOLDT PENGUIN
(Spheniscus humboldti)
Vulnerable

Humboldt_penguin.jpgMAJOR THREATS
Fisheries in Peru exploit the main prey of the penguins, greatly reducing their prey base.
Alien species such as rats predate on the eggs of the penguins and also on young chicks. There have also been reports of feral cats on the islands in Peru which can cause a predation risks to both adult and juvenile individuals.
Andean foxes can enter coastal reserves in Peru and prey on the adult and juvenile penguins.
Humboldt Penguins are extremely sensitive to human presence which reduces the success of breeding at frequently visited sites.
These penguins are also at risk from habitat loss and pollution.

FUN FACT
Humboldt penguins were named for the German scientist, Alexander Von Humboldt, who explored Cuba, Mexico, and South America in 1799.


SCARLET MACAW
(Ara macao)
Least Concern

scarlet-macaw-pictures.jpg
MAJOR THREATS
There are currently no major threats to the Scarlet Macaw but their population trend is currently decreasing. It is predicted that the population of Scarlet Macaws will drop by around 25% in the next 3 generations.

 

 

FUN FACT
They are said to have the intelligence of a 4-8 year old child.

 

 


AMAZON RIVER DOLPHIN (BOTO)
(Inia geoffrensis)
Data Deficient

shutterstock_164233874-1024x679.jpgMAJOR THREATS
Accidental death in fishing gear such as in gill nets. 
Deliberate killing for fish bait.
Fishing with explosives although illegal in most places is still common in areas of the Amazon.
Damming of rivers.
Between 1956 and the early 1970s, more than 100 botos were live-captured and exported mostly to the USA, Europe and Japan

FUN FACT
These dolphins are PINK!


Click here for more Animal Travels.

 

Sources:

Images courtesy of:

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s