Animal Travels: Peru

PERUVIAN WOOLLY MONKEY
(Lagothrix cana)
Endangered

57bafda8408a8.image.jpgMAJOR THREATS
This species is heavily hunted and infants are much favoured as pets. The females with offspring tend to be targeted by hunters, so that they can sell the infants as pets. Hunting is the main threat prior to deforestation, and colonization severely reduces their numbers.  Heavy deforestation also occurs in many parts of this species’ range.

FUN FACT
Can move at speeds of up to 35mph.


HUMBOLDT PENGUIN
(Spheniscus humboldti)
Vulnerable

Humboldt_penguin.jpgMAJOR THREATS
Fisheries in Peru exploit the main prey of the penguins, greatly reducing their prey base.
Alien species such as rats predate on the eggs of the penguins and also on young chicks. There have also been reports of feral cats on the islands in Peru which can cause a predation risks to both adult and juvenile individuals.
Andean foxes can enter coastal reserves in Peru and prey on the adult and juvenile penguins.
Humboldt Penguins are extremely sensitive to human presence which reduces the success of breeding at frequently visited sites.
These penguins are also at risk from habitat loss and pollution.

FUN FACT
Humboldt penguins were named for the German scientist, Alexander Von Humboldt, who explored Cuba, Mexico, and South America in 1799.


SCARLET MACAW
(Ara macao)
Least Concern

scarlet-macaw-pictures.jpg
MAJOR THREATS
There are currently no major threats to the Scarlet Macaw but their population trend is currently decreasing. It is predicted that the population of Scarlet Macaws will drop by around 25% in the next 3 generations.

 

 

FUN FACT
They are said to have the intelligence of a 4-8 year old child.

 

 


AMAZON RIVER DOLPHIN (BOTO)
(Inia geoffrensis)
Data Deficient

shutterstock_164233874-1024x679.jpgMAJOR THREATS
Accidental death in fishing gear such as in gill nets. 
Deliberate killing for fish bait.
Fishing with explosives although illegal in most places is still common in areas of the Amazon.
Damming of rivers.
Between 1956 and the early 1970s, more than 100 botos were live-captured and exported mostly to the USA, Europe and Japan

FUN FACT
These dolphins are PINK!


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Animal Travels: Antarctica

Antarctica is over 5 million square miles and has some extremely well adapted species living there!


PENGUINS
There are six species of penguin that call Antarctica home.

  1. Aptenodytes_forsteri_-Snow_Hill_Island,_Antarctica_-adults_and_juvenile-8.jpgEmperor Penguin
    (Aptenodytes forsteri)
    Near Threatened
    595,000 mature individuals remaining in the wild with no current major threats.
  2. 152708-004-5B3C83E2.jpgChinstrap Penguin
    (Pygoscelis antarcticus)
    Least Concern
    Declining population trend can be attributed to threats from recent volcanic activity, human disturbances of breeding colonies and the harvesting of Antarctic krill which makes up the bulk of their diet.
  3. gentoopenguin.jpgGentoo Penguin
    (Pygoscelis papua)
    Least Concern
    774,000 mature individuals.
    Major threats come from the collection of eggs and disturbances from tourism which decrease breeding productivity.
  4. main-qimg-84bebfb4702b4086740772ded2d31fd8-c.jpegAdelie Penguin
    (Pygoscelis adeliae)
    Least Concern
    7580,000 mature individuals remaining in the wild and an increasing population trend.
    Their major threats come from climate change, the building of research stations which change their habitat and from the disturbance from tourists and scientists.
  5. Right-Whale-Bay-King-Penguin-1.jpgKing Penguin
    (Aptenodytes patagonicus)
    Least Concern
    Increasing population trend but faces threats from increasing sea temperatures, disturbance from helicopter flights which causes breeding failure; and disturbances from scientists and tourists.
  6. Macaroni_penguin.jpgMacaroni Penguin
    Eudyptes chrysolophus)
    Vulnerable
    Decreasing population trend which has faced major threats from commercial fishing, the warming of oceans, disturbance from scientists and tourists. Also increasing numbers of Fur Seal is leading to increased predation.

KILLER WHALE
(Orcinus orca)
There are 5 types of Orca in Antarctic waters.

  1. antarctic_type_a.jpgType A
    A very large orca: reaching lengths of up to 31 feet.
    Hunt Minke whales.
  2. Pitman whale and seal.jpgType B Large
    Also known as Pack Ice Orcas.
    Hunt seals and are famous for their “wave-washing” hunting technique.
  3. 17b769b5aef86dc4c15d519f3e4b3f60-nature-animals-wild-animals.jpg
    Type B Small
    Also known as Gerlache Orcas.
    They are believed to feed on penguins.
  4. full_Paul_Ensor__Gateway_Antarctica__University_of_Canterbury_5322_small.jpgType C
    Also known as the Ross Sea Orca.
    They are the smallest orcas reaching lengths of 20 feet.
  5. image_1172_1-killer-whale-type-d.jpgType D
    These are Subantarctic orcas.
    They look different from other orcas and are easily distinguished by their large melon.
    Very little is known about these orcas.

To read more about orcas, you can read my post “All About Killer Whales


Leopard-Seal-1.jpgLEOPARD SEAL
(Hydrurga leptonyx)
Least Concern
18,000 mature individuals remaining in the wild.

MAJOR THREATS
There are no major threats from human activity currently. However, climate change is leading to loss of sufficient pack ice for pupping and resting. There is also becoming less penguins available as prey for the leopard seals.

 

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Animal Travels: France

With almost 250,000 square miles of space France is packed with wildlife from the Alpine Ibex to the Common Genet.


ALPINE IBEX
(Capra ibex)
MG_5228_950Pixels_WM.jpgListed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List with a increasing population trend. There is estimated to be around 31420 mature individuals remaining in the wild.

HABITAT, DIET & BEHAVIOUR
You can find an Alpine Ibex on open and rocky habitats at high altitudes. They feed on alpine grasses and are a diurnal species that is most active in the early morning and late afternoon.

MAJOR THREATS
Currently they are not believed to be facing any threats but there are concerns about their genetic diversity. Their habitats are surrounded by high densities of domestic goats and sheep which can carry a risk of parasites and disease.

CONSERVATION
The Alpine Ibex is listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

KINGDOM PHYLUM CLASS ORDER FAMILY
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Cetartiodactyla Bovidae

BEECH MARTEN
(Martes foina)
beech marten.jpgThe Beech Marten is listed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List with a stable population trend.

HABITAT
Beech Martens prefer open areas, however in countries such as France they are becoming more common in urban and suburban areas. In these countries they can be found nesting in attics, barns and even in car engine spaces.

MAJOR THREATS
These little animals can sometimes be persecuted as a pest and some of them also suffer from rabies.

CONSERVATION
Beech Martens are also listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

KINGDOM PHYLUM CLASS ORDER FAMILY
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Carnivora Mustelidae

CHAMOIS
(Rupicapra rupicapra)
chamois-4-640x425.pngThis species is also luckily listed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List with around 440,000 mature individuals remaining in the wild.

HABITAT & DIET
The Chamois likes to live on steep, rocky areas in the mountain and they feed on grasses, herbs, leaves, buds, shoots and fungi.

MAJOR THREATS
They are currently suffering from poaching and overhunting; and they are also facing competition from domestic livestock. There have also been outbreaks of pestivirus and sarcoptic mange in some populations.

CONSERVATION
Yet another species from France that is listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

KINGDOM PHYLUM CLASS ORDER FAMILY
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Cetartiodactyla Bovidae

COMMON GENET
(Genetta genetta)
CommonGenet.JPGListed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List and with a stable population trend.

HABITAT & DIET
The Common Genet prefers wooded habitat and can often be found around water. They feed primarily on small mammals but they will also take birds, vertebrates, insects and fruit depending on the availability of prey.

MAJOR THREATS
The main threats for these animals come from road traffic collisions and hunting. They are killed for their meat, body parts, skin and fur.

CONSERVATION
They are mostly found in protected areas and they are also listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

KINGDOM PHYLUM CLASS ORDER FAMILY
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Carnivora Viverridae

ALPINE MARMOT
(Marmota marmota)
marmot.jpgThese little rodents are listed as Least Concern (YAY FOR FRANCE!!) by the IUCN Red List with a stable population trend.

HABITAT & DIET
They live in alpine meadows and high altitude pastures eating a fully herbivorous diet.

MAJOR THREATS
Alpine Marmots are hunting for their meat, fur and fat.

CONSERVATION
They mostly occur in national park and are listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

KINGDOM PHYLUM CLASS ORDER FAMILY
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Rodentia Sciuridae

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Animal Travels: New Zealand

New Zealand is probably less thought about than their big next door neighbours when it comes to wildlife; but with almost 103,500 square miles of land and a population of almost 5 million, this little island is no stranger to animals.

New Zealand is famous for its Kiwis and is home to 5 species of them:

  1. Southern Brown Kiwi (Apteryx australis) Vulnerable
  2. Great Spotted Kiwi (Apteryx haasti) Vulnerable 
  3. Northern Brown Kiwi (Apteryx mantelli) Endangered
  4. Little Spotted Kiwi (Apteryx owenii) Near Threatened
  5. Okarito Brown Kiwi (Apteryx rowi) Endangered

OKARITO BROWN KIWI
(Apteryx rowi)
120048Birds online CD1 084.jpgAlthough these kiwis are endangered they have an increasing population trend with around 200-250 mature individuals remaining in the wild.

HABITAT
The native population of the Okarito Brown Kiwi has now been restricted to 10,000ha of forest between the Okarito River and the Waiho River.

MAJOR THREATS
These kiwis are affected by habitat loss and predation of introduced mammals. Chicks are predated by stoats and some adults are killed by dogs and in road traffic collisions.

CONSERVATION
Operation Nest Egg has been put in place to help reduce the affects of predation. Eggs are removed from nests and the chicks are hand reared until they are large enough that they are no longer the prey of stoats.

NORTHERN BROWN KIWI
(Apteryx mantelli)
TeTuatahianui.jpgAgain, these kiwis are endangered but they current have a stable population trend.

HABITAT
These kiwis can be found in dense, subtropical, and temperate forests but can also occasionally be found living in shrub lands.

MAJOR THREATS
These kiwis face threats from the predation of dogs and ferrets.

CONSERVATION
These kiwis are also a part of Operation Nest Egg.

KEA
(Nestor notabilis)
kea-for-kate.pngThese birds have a declining population trend with around 3300 mature individuals remaining in the wild. They are classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List.

HABITAT AND DIET
The Kea prefer high altitude forests and alpine basins, feeding on a diet of shoots and berries.

MAJOR THREATS
Climate change, deforestation and killings by farmers are the most current threats to the numbers of Kea.

CONSERVATION
Kea are listed on CITES Appendix II and there is a population census planned to take place soon to get a more accurate count of the remaining individuals.

HECTOR’S DOLPHIN
(Cephalorhynchus hectori)
hectorsjump_labelled_cropped_22629.jpgThese dolphins are Endangered with around 7500 mature individuals remaining in the wild and a decreasing population trend.

HABITAT AND DIET
Hector’s Dolphins inhabit the shallow coastal waters within 15km of the shore of New Zealand; feeding on squid and several species of small fish.

MAJOR THREATS
The largest threat to the Hector’s Dolphin is entanglement in gill nets. Around 60% of deaths were due to entrapment in gill nets.

CONSERVATION
They are listed on CITES Appendix II and they occur mostly in protected areas (consisting of two sanctuaries).

NEW ZEALAND SEA LION
(Phocarctos hookeri)
sea-lion565.jpgThese Sea Lions are Endangered with a decreasing population trend and around 3000 mature individuals remaining in the wild.

MAJOR THREATS
Commercial sealing in the early 19th century until the mid-20th century depleted the population. They are also in danger from epizootic outbreaks.

CONSERVATION
The New Zealand government has protected these Sea Lions since 1881 and they are also covered under the Marine Mammal Protection Act 1978.

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Animal Travels: Holland

With 2119 square miles of space and a population of almost 6 and a half million, Holland has its own ‘Big Five’. The Red Deer, Wild Boar, Roe Deer, Badger and the Red Fox.

RED DEER
(Cervus elaphus)
Unknown.jpegThe Red Deer is classified as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List and they have an increasing population trend.

HABITAT AND DIET
Red Deer can found in a range of habitats including: open deciduous woodland, mixed forests and coniferous woodland, upland moors and mountainous areas; but they prefer broadleaved woodland that is interspersed by large meadows. Red Deer feed mainly of shrub and tree shoots but they will sometimes dine on grasses, fruits and seeds.

MAJOR THREATS
Red Deer are facing trouble from habitat loss and overhunting. They are also susceptible to the spread of parasites and diseases from introduced species.

WILD BOAR
(Sus scrofa)
Wild-Boar-1_public-640x425.jpgThese mammals are classified as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List however, their current population trend is unknown.

HABITAT, DIET AND BEHAVIOUR
Again, Wild Boars can be found in a wide variety of habitats, whether that is temperate and tropical habitats such as semi-desert regions and tropical rainforests. They can also inhabit temperate woodlands and grasslands. Wild Boars are omnivorous, although vegetable matter makes up around 90% of their diet. These Boars are most active in early mornings and late afternoon and they spend around 4-8 per day foraging.

MAJOR THREATS
Globally, there are no major threats to Wild Boars; but locally, they can be susceptible to habitat destruction and hunting pressures.

ROE DEER
(Capreolus capreolus)
Roe-deer-buck-moulting-into-summer-coat%2c-Pigneys-Wood%2c-Julian-Thomas%2c-11-May-2015-(small).jpgAgain, the Roe Deer is classified as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List with an increasing population trend. There are around 15 million mature individuals remaining in the wild.

HABITAT
These deer prefer landscapes with a mosaic of woodland and farmland.

MAJOR THREATS
There is an increased mixing of various genetic pools which could leave the Roe Deer susceptible to diseases and parasites. They also face danger from poaching, free-roaming dogs and collisions with vehicles.

CONSERVATION
There have been re-introductions of Roe Deer into depleted populations.

EURASIAN BADGER
(Meles meles)
140506.jpgThe Eurasian Badger is another species that is listed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List. These Badgers currently have a stable population trend.

HABITAT AND DIET
Badgers prefer either deciduous woods with clearings, or open pastureland with patches of woodland. They are opportunistic foragers with an omnivorous diet, feeding on fruits, nuts, cereal crops, invertebrates and some vertebrates such as hedgehogs, moles and rabbits.

MAJOR THREATS
Land use changes have caused a loss of suitable habitat for the badgers. Badgers are also persecuted as a pest and in places like the UK they are believed to be associated with bovine TB and so this lead to a cull. Also, rabies reduced numbers of badgers throughout Europe.

RED FOX
(Vulpes vulpes)
150px-Red_fox.jpgThe final of Holland’s ‘Big Five’ is also classified as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List with a stable population trend.

HABITAT
The Red Fox can survive in extremely diverse habitats such as the tundra, deserts and forests as well as in city centres. Their natural habitat is a dry, mixed landscape with scrub and woodland. Foxes now appear to be closely associated with people and so can be found wherever there is human life.

MAJOR THREATS
Threats to Red Foxes are highly localised and include habitat degradation, loss and fragmentation. Globally, Red Foxes don’t face any major threats. The Red Fox is classed as a pest and so is unprotected throughout all its range. In the future, this could potentially cause problems.

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Animal Travels: Scotland

Scotland probably isn’t a place you think of when you think of wildlife, but with over 30,090 square miles of space there are plenty of species to see.

ATLANTIC PUFFIN
(Fratercula arctica)
AtlanticPuffin-JimParis.JPGThe Atlantic Puffin is a small sized bird with a wingspan of 47-63cm and is listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List. Their current population trend is decreasing and there are currently between 9,550,00 and 11,600,000 mature individuals remaining in the wild.

They are exclusively marine and are found on rocky coasts and offshore islands; nesting on grassy slopes, sea cliffs and rocky slopes.

The Atlantic Puffin is facing some threats to their survival; they are highly susceptible to the impacts of climate change such as the rise of sea temperatures. They are also vulnerable to oil spills and other marine pollution. Extreme weather evens and storms also pose a threat to the Atlantic Puffins. These Puffins can also get caught in gillnets and other fishing gear and they are vulnerable to invasive predators such as rats and cats at their breeding colonies. Also, in places such as Iceland and the Faroe Islands they are hunting for human consumption.

To help save the Atlantic Puffin, they are listed under the African Eurasian Waterbird Agreement.

EURASIAN OTTER
(Lutra lutra)
shutterstock_81397669-1240x660.jpgThe Eurasian Otter is listed as Near Threatened by the IUCN Red List with a current declining population trend.

These otters can be found in aquatic habitats including highland and lowland lakes, rivers, streams and marshes. They are historically hunted for the pelts and for use as food. However, their major threats come from pollution, drowning and road kills. Their habitats are also extremely vulnerable to man made changes such as the canalisation of rivers.

Eurasian Otters are listed on Appendix I of CITES and they are also a species in the European Breeding Programme (EEP) for self-sustaining captive populations.

GOLDEN EAGLE
(Aquila chrysaetos)
golden_eagel_01.jpgThe Golden Eagle is classified as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List with around 200,000 mature individuals and stable population.

They can be found in flat or mountainous open habitats, often above the tree line. They have a very broad diet and will take mammals, birds, reptiles, fish and amphibians depending on the prey availability. They were heavily persecuted in the nineteenth century and today they are still deliberately shot, trapped and poisoned.

EURASIAN BADGER
(Meles meles)
140506.jpgThe Eurasian Badger is classified as Least Concern and they currently have a stable population.

The Eurasian Badger prefers deciduous woods with clearings, or open pastureland with small patches of woodland. They can also be found in mixed and coniferous woodland, scrub, suburban and urban parks. Land use changes are causing a loss of suitable habitat for the badgers and they are sometimes persecuted as pests. For example, in the UK they are associated with Bovine TB and this has led to a cull of the badger population. They are also occasionally killed as a by catch of fox hunting.

The Eurasian Badger is listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention and they are also listed on Schedule 6 of the United Kingdom Wildlife and Countryside Act and they are listed under the Protection of Badgers Act.

RED DEER
(Cervus elaphus)
lyme-park.jpgThe Red Deer is listed as Least Concern and they currently have an increasing population trend. They inhabit open deciduous woodland, upland moors and open mountainous areas. However, they have been known to prefer broadleaved woodland that is interspersed with large meadows.

They are facing threats from overhunting, habitat loss and the intermixing of various subspecies. However, they are protected under Appendix III of the Bern Convention.

RED SQUIRREL
(Sciurus vulgaris)
red_squirrel.jpgRed Squirrels are classified as Least Concern but they do have a declining population. They are the most abundant in large tracts of coniferous forest and they also occur in deciduous woods, mixed forests, parks and gardens.

Habitat loss and fragmentation is a threat to the red squirrel. However, their main threat comes from Grey Squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) who not only out-compete the red squirrels for food and space; but they also carry the parapox virus which is highly pathogenic to red squirrels, without affected the grey squirrels. Luckily, the red squirrel lives in many protected areas throughout its range.

WESTERN CAPERCAILLIE
(Tetrao urogallus)
Capercaillie.jpgThe Capercaillie is classified as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List. Their current population is decreasing and they were reintroduced to the UK. They inhabit forest and woodland but prefer areas of old and shady forest with damp soil. The Capercaillie is a lekking species and so the males need to protect a small territory to earn mating opportunities.

Capercaillies are still commonly hunted and face predation from foxes. They are also facing trouble from the destruction or alteration of their woodland habitat.

SCOTTISH WILDCAT
(Felis silvestris)
Scottish-wildcat-MS3000TIFF.jpgWildcats are classed as Least Concern but their population trend is decreasing. They are found in scrub grassland to dry and mixed forests. Rodents such as rats are the staple part of their diet.

Wildcats face threats by domestic cats as they also compete with wildcats for prey and space and there is also a high potential for disease transmission between the domestic cats and the wildcats. Other threats come from human interactions such as road kills.

Wildcats are included on CITES Appendix II and are fully protected across their European range.

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Animal Travels: Kenya

Kenya is a country in East Africa with a population of just over 43 million people. Kenya is a popular tourist destination for seeing wildlife such as ‘The Big 5’ and with 224,610 square miles savannahs and tropical and subtropical rainforests its clear to see why Kenya is so abundant in wildlife.

AFRICAN ELEPHANT
(Loxodonta africana)
African_Elephant_7.27.2012_whytheymatter_HI_58709.jpgThe African Elephant is classed as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List. There is evidence that the African Elephant should be split into two separate species: The Savannah Elephant (Loxodonta africana) and the Forest Elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis). The African Elephant is the largest terrestrial (land) animal, and luckily for them their numbers are on the rise.

They can be found roaming in dense forests, open and closed savannahs, grassland and occasionally in arid deserts. The African Elephants do have some major threats to their survival. Historically the main threat came in the form of illegal hunting (poaching) for ivory and meat. However, recently the most current threat is the loss and fragmentation of habitat.

AFRICAN BUFFALO
(Syncerus caffer)
african_buffalo_1.jpgThe African Buffalo is classified as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List. Its believed that there is around three of four different subspecies of African Buffalo: The Forest Buffalo (S.c nanus), the West African Savannah Buffalo (S.c brachyceros), the Central African Savannah Buffalo (S.c aequinoctialis) and the Southern Savannah Buffalo (S.c caffer). Unfortunately for the African Buffalo their numbers are on the decline.

They are distributed throughout sub-Saharan African and can be found in semi-arid bushland, Acacia woodland, montane grasslands and forests, coastal savannahs and moist lowland rainforests. African Buffalo have faced several major threats to their survival. In the 1890s the rinderpest epidemic, coupled with pleuro-pneumonia, caused mortality rates as high as 95%. Since the 1890s diseases such as rinderpest and anthrax have continued to result in localised declines and extinctions in populations. The African Buffalo is also subject to habitat loss and drought. They are also a favourite target of meat hunters and so have high rates of illegal hunting.

CHEETAH
(Acinonyx jubatus)
Cheetah_portrait_Whipsnade_Zoo.jpgThe Cheetah is listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List and their numbers are currently in decline with only 6674 mature individuals left in the wild. Cheetahs are the only cat that has non-retractile claws and are the fastest land mammal.

They can be found in the dry forest and thick scrub, grasslands and also in hyperarid deserts. The Cheetah is facing some major threats to their survival. Habitat loss and fragmentation is causing big problems for the cheetahs, as well as high speed roads and human-cheetah conflict. Cheetahs rarely hunt livestock but in desperate times they will choose livestock as their prey, this results in retaliation kills from the farmers.

LEOPARD
(Panthera pardus)
Leop_Billy.jpgThe Leopard is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List and they currently have a decreasing population trend.

Leopards can be found in desert and semi desert regions, arid regions, rugged montane and savannah grasslands. Leopards are currently facing major threats from habitat fragmentation, reduced prey bases and from conflicts with livestock.

AFRICAN LION
(Panthera leo)
nws-st-african-lion-male.jpgThe African Lion is listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List and again they currently have a declining population trend, with around 23000-39000 mature individuals in the wild.

African Lions are only absent from the tropical rainforests and the interior of the Sahara desert. Lions are the most social of the cats with related females remaining together in prides. African Lions are facing major threats from indiscriminate killings, prey base depletion and habitat loss and conversion.

BLACK RHINO
(Diceros bicornis)
rhinocloseup_351196.jpgThe Black Rhino is classified as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Red List but luckily their current population is increasing.

Black Rhinos can be found everywhere from desert areas to wetter forested areas. The highest densities of black rhino are found in savannahs and in succulent valleys. Black Rhinos are facing a major threat from poaching for the international rhino horn trade, and also from habitat changes, competing species and alien plant invasions.

GIRAFFE
(Giraffa camelopardalis)
Misha-giraffe-670328.jpgThe Giraffe is currently listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List and unfortunately the current population numbers are decreasing with around 68293 mature individuals remaining in the wild.

Most giraffes can be found in savannah and woodland habitats. Giraffes have four major threats to their survival:
1. Habitat loss
2. Civil unrest
3. Illegal hunting (poaching)
4. Ecological changes

HIPPOPOTAMUS
(Hippopotamus amphibius)
hippo-facts-3.jpgThe IUCN Red List lists the Hippopotamus as Vulnerable and their current population numbers are stable. The hippo spends its days in the water and emerges at night to feed. Hippos require a permanent source of water as their skin needs to remain moist so that it doesn’t crack. They also secrete a red liquid that is believed to function as a sunblock and an antibiotic.

The major threats that are affecting the survival of the hippo come from habitat loss and the illegal and unregulated hunting of hippos for their meat and ivory.

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