Dog Breeds 101: Pembroke Welsh Corgi

 

Pembroke-Welsh-Corgi-On-White-01.jpgKEY INFORMATION

Lifespan

Height

Weight

12-14 years

10-12 inches

27 to 30 pounds

pembroke-welsh-corgi.jpgTEMPERAMENT

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is known for being a happy, loving and intelligent breed. However, they can have a stubborn and independent streak. Generally they are easy to train but they do like to think for themselves at times.

This breed loves food and it can be used as a great motivator during training, but as they love to eat they can easily become obese if their food is not regulated.

Pembroke Welsh Corgis make good watchdogs as they are suspicious of strangers and are quick to bark when their households or themselves feel threatened.

Like all dogs the Pembroke Welsh Corgi requires early socialisation to ensure they grow into healthy, happy and well-rounded adults.

prance-8.jpgGROOMING

This breed is double coated with a think undercoat and longer topcoat; because of this they shed continuously with heavy shedding twice a year. They are easy to groom but shedding can cause a problem is brushing isn’t kept up with. It is recommended to brush your Pembroke Welsh Corgi once a day while they are going through their heavy shedding.

CHILDREN AND OTHER PETS

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi will get on well with children but due to their natural herding instinct they are prone to biting children on the ankles and feet. This is a behaviour that can be trained out at a young age however.

Again, as long as they are socialised with other pets in the household they will get along well.

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On The Brink: Dama Gazelle

 

Dama-Gazelle-3-700x350.jpgThe Dama Gazelle (Nanger dama) is a critically endangered (CR) antelope living in Africa. They have been listed a CR since 2006 when they were upgraded from endangered due to having a population size below 250 mature individuals. There are currently 5 surviving subpopulations which are fragmented and are considered to contain less than 50 mature individuals.

Dama-Gazelle.jpgWhile the Dama Gazelle used to roam most of the Sahara and surrounding countries, it is now only native in Chad, Mali and Niger after going extinct in Mauritania, Senegal, Sudan, Tunisia and the Western Sahara.

maxresdefault.jpgThe main threats that caused the decline in numbers of the Dama Gazelle was the introduction of firearms which lead to the uncontrolled hunting of the Dama Gazelle. They also have harm from habitat loss and degradation cause by the overpopulation of domestic animals and pastureland.

The biggest problem they are facing to their conservation is whether to isolate populations to reduce chances of external diseases and intraspecies competition or to allow them to integrate and breed within the different populations. The largest issue with isolating populations is that inbreeding will reduce genetic diversity and their ability to adapt to new diseases and habitat change.

To learn more about the Dama Gazelle and their conservation head over to the IUCN Red List.

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