Dog Breeds 101: Pyrenean Mountain Dog

Hi guys,

I know I’ve been missing for several months but the time has come to make my return, I have missed blogging and sharing my knowledge and connecting with people online, but I did completely lose my inspiration and motivation for the blog and I had got to a point where I wasn’t happy with the posts that were going up! A break was well needed so that I could get my head in the right place to continue delivering content that I am proud of and that people will enjoy.

With all that said I’m going to dive into this post!

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KEY INFORMATION

Lifespan

Height

Weight

10-12 years

65-82cm

36-54kg

TEMPERAMENT

Pyreneans although giant in stature, are gentle dogs particularly around children which has made them a family favourite for many years. However, like many large dogs Pyreneans are slow to mature and only reach full maturity between 3 and 4 years of age, and this must be taking into account when training them.

Also, Pyreneans contain a stubborn streak that can provide further challenges during training, but despite this they are extremely loyal and form unbreakable bonds with their families. They respond well to positive reinforcement training but don’t take too kindly to any negative reinforcement, which may lead them to more disobedient behaviour. Furthermore, they enjoy the sound of their own voices and will bark at any noise unless this behaviour is assessed early on in life.

Like all dogs the Pyrenean Mountain Dog requires socialisation from a young age to enable them to mature into well-rounded and happy dogs.

Also, due to their inquisitive nature Pyreneans are quite the escape artists and so a well fenced yard is required to ensure they don’t leave for their own adventures. They also contain a high prey drive so intense training is needed for off leash walking as they are generally unresponsive to a recall command when they are in that frame of mind.

pyrenean-mountain-dog-puppy.jpgFAMILY LIVING

The Pyrenean Mountain Dog loves being in a family environment and thoroughly enjoy being involved in things that go on around them, which includes playing with children. While most Pyreneans take care to be extra gentle around children, their large size and strength can be something of an issue and extra attention is needed around the children.

Pyreneans will get on with other pets in the house such as cats if they have been raised with them and if socialised correctly they will also get along with other dogs.

HEALTH

The Pyrenean Mountain Dog has some hereditary conditions such as:

  • Hip dysplasia (due to their size, risk factor can reduced by not allowing the dog to climb up and down stairs, and to use shorter walks until they have reached maturity to ensure that there is less stress on the joints while they are growing)
  • Epilepsy
  • Tricuspid dysplasia
  • Osteosarcoma
  • Entropion (eyelids folding inwards)
  • Bloat/Gastric torsion (the risk of this can also be minimised by using a raised feeder and ensuring the dog doesn’t eat too quickly)

Pyrenean-Mountain-Dog.jpgGROOMING

Pyreneans require a lot of grooming due to their double coat. Ideally, they need to be brushed everyday to remove dead and loose hair and prevent matting. As they have a double coat they shed a lot of hair, more so in the Spring and then Autumn.

It is also important to keep their ears clean to prevent a build up of wax that can cause ear infections.

EXERCISE

Although the Pyrenean Mountain Dog is a low energy dog they still require a decent amount of exercising. The recommended amount is around 2 hours of exercise a day for these dogs to ensure they have enough physical and mental stimulation. However, as said earlier it is important to not overexercise a Pyrenean early in life while their bones and joints are still developing to avoid issues with their joints later in life.

 

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