Dog Breeds 101: Pembroke Welsh Corgi

 

Pembroke-Welsh-Corgi-On-White-01.jpgKEY INFORMATION

Lifespan

Height

Weight

12-14 years

10-12 inches

27 to 30 pounds

pembroke-welsh-corgi.jpgTEMPERAMENT

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is known for being a happy, loving and intelligent breed. However, they can have a stubborn and independent streak. Generally they are easy to train but they do like to think for themselves at times.

This breed loves food and it can be used as a great motivator during training, but as they love to eat they can easily become obese if their food is not regulated.

Pembroke Welsh Corgis make good watchdogs as they are suspicious of strangers and are quick to bark when their households or themselves feel threatened.

Like all dogs the Pembroke Welsh Corgi requires early socialisation to ensure they grow into healthy, happy and well-rounded adults.

prance-8.jpgGROOMING

This breed is double coated with a think undercoat and longer topcoat; because of this they shed continuously with heavy shedding twice a year. They are easy to groom but shedding can cause a problem is brushing isn’t kept up with. It is recommended to brush your Pembroke Welsh Corgi once a day while they are going through their heavy shedding.

CHILDREN AND OTHER PETS

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi will get on well with children but due to their natural herding instinct they are prone to biting children on the ankles and feet. This is a behaviour that can be trained out at a young age however.

Again, as long as they are socialised with other pets in the household they will get along well.

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My Experience With A Difficult Dog

Happy New Year to my readers! I hope you had a good holiday season and you are now looking forward to the New Year like myself. For this post I’m going to be writing about my experience with my difficult dog.

IMG_0158.JPGJust over three years ago we got a new puppy who we picked because he was the runt of the litter, getting picked on by the other puppies in his litter and had an infection running throughout his tiny body. The breeder mentioned that he had growled at everyone who had been to see him. It was for all these reasons that we picked him, knowing that he was likely to be a difficult dog and that if he went to the wrong people disaster could happen.

Our little puppy found his home on my sister’s knee and it took a lot of coaxing to get him to come off. He was a scared little guy. Luckily he was introduced to all of my family while he was still extremely young and so was unable to physically do damage to us. Now that he is older however, it is almost impossible to introduce him to new people without him being muzzled. We don’t trust him to not try to attack and are responsible dog owners who would never allow that to happen.

IMG_1921.JPGOn walks he is perfectly fine with a head collar and a choke collar which allows us to move his focus and to also discipline him if necessary. It did take a lot of hard work to get to this point as he usually just cowered whenever a car went past and then refused to move any further.

Last year I got into a relationship and this caused some problems regarding our little psycho dog as we call him. It meant that for my other half to visit my house, the dog needed to be muzzled. Unfortunately muzzling him makes him much more aggressive than he is without.

IMG_1922.JPGOn Christmas, we made a big breakthrough on my puppy and partner’s relationship. Using a head collar and choke collar we were able to keep my dog under control and calm long enough for my partner to give him commands and reward him with a treat. It really was Christmas!!

Do any of my reader have experience with difficult dogs? Leave me a comment below or speak to me over at Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.